Archive for the ‘Veggies, dry’ Category

Methi Aloo Sabji(potatoes with fenugreek leaves)

Winter is a great season for greens and when JF saw some vibrant fresh methi (fenugreek) leaves at the grocery, he couldn’t resist buying some. Then I have to decide what to cook with them! There are a lot of tasty dishes using methi. This is a really simple one.

  • 1/2 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tsp urad dal
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/2 red onion chopped
  • 2 med. potatoes, chopped
  • 1 bunch of methi leaves, plucked (depending on your size of bunch or how much methi you want to add)
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  • red chili powder to taste
  • salt to taste
  • 1 TBS dried kasoori methi (optional)

Heat oil and pop the mustard seeds, cumin seeds, then urad dal. Add the garlic and onion and cook till translucent. Add the potatoes and cover to cook for a few minutes. When the potatoes are half cooked, add the chopped methi leaves, spices, salt, and a sprinkle of water (! TBS or less) put the lid back on and continue to cook until the potatoes are done. It should not be watery.

I am sending this to CompleteMyThali- Subji Event hosted by PJ at Seduce your Tastebuds and started by Jagruti

and to Veggie/Fruit of the month: Potato hosted by Divya at Dil Se and started by Priya

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Moong dal and Cabbage Palya

Aren’t sprouted moong dal about the cutest things? I sprouted some extra and saved half in the freezer for next time.

Its very easy to do, if you havent tried it. Soak the whole green moong dal in plenty of water overnight. Be sure all the beans have plumped up. Drain the water and place in a strainer or colander and cover with a damp cloth. Once or twice a day rinse the dal with fresh water and cover again with the cloth until the sprouts grow as long as you like.

This is a super simple and healthy side with sambar and rice or chapathi.

Here is what I did:

  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp urad dal
  • sprig curry leaves
  • 3-4 dried red chilies
  • sprinkle of turmeric
  • pinch of hing
  • 1/2 whole moong sprouted
  • 1/2 small head cabbage grated or julienned finely (I used red cabbage)
  • 1-2 TBS grated coconut

Boil 1c of water and add the moong. Cook this only for a couple minutes then drain. Just enough to take the raw taste off and soften them, but do not overcook.

Heat a saute pan and add oil. Then splutter the mustard seeds, add urad dal, curry leaves, red chilies and hing. Then add the cabbage, salt and turmeric and stir fry for 5 minutes. Add in the moong dal and about 2 tsp of water and cover the pan, letting it cook for another 10 minutes or so, until the cabbage is done to your liking. Remove from the heat and sprinkle fresh shredded coconut on top.

I am sending this to CompleteMyThali- Subji Event hosted by PJ at Seduce your Tastebuds and started by Jagruti

 

Crispy Okra Fry

MMM, okra! One of my very favorite veggies (not quite as beloved as eggplant). I like it in almost every form, but I especially love it fried (is it any surprise??). The important thing is to not let it get slimy, and there are a couple tricks to accomplish that. First, wash and completely dry them. If there is any moisture while cutting it releases the mucousy stuff. Then use a dry knife and wipe the knife every so often. Do not salt it until nearly cooked or after frying.

For frying, this is what I did:

Slice the okra lengthwise into thin strips.

In a bowl, mix besan flour with 1 TBS or so of rice flour, red chili powder to taste, pinch of turmeric powder, pinch of chaat masala or garam masala. Cover the okra pieces with the mixture. I havent given quantities because it depends on how much okra you are using. Add just enough besan flour to coat the pieces, not too much. And do not add any water or liquid!

You can shallow fry if you have a very large pan to accommodate all the slices without crowding, or do it in batches. Or you can deep fry them. Sprinkle salt as soon as you remove them from the oil. You can also squeeze lemon over it, and serve immediately.

Sending this to “Only Greens” event¬† by Sara and Pari

Carrot Kosambari

Sometimes you want something fresh and crunchy to go with your meal. Sometimes you realize you need an extra dish to fill up the tummies.¬† Or maybe you want to boost the protein in a vegetarian meal. Maybe you need something fast and simple. Kosambari fits the bill. Its basically an indian salad, but don’t think about iceberg lettuce and heavy creamy dressings. This is very light and healthy. If you thought you cannot eat raw legumes, think again.

  • 1/4c split moong dal soaked for 30 min – 1 hour
  • 1-2 carrot shredded
  • lemon juice
  • salt
  • coriander leaves

Tadka/oggarne:

  • coconut oil (or any)
  • mustard seeds/saasve
  • 1-2 green chili minced
  • curry leaves/karive soppu

Soak the moong dal for at least 30 minutes- 1 hour. It should have not have a hard center. You can use hot water to speed the process (I think this is better in a cold climate). Shred the carrot. Prepare the other ingredients.

Heat oil and pop the mustard seeds, then add green chilies and curry leaves and sizzle them. If you want you can add moong dal to this and stir for a minute. Or simply pour the seasoning over the dal, carrot. Add salt, lemon juice, and coriander leaves to taste.

Variations:

Traditionally, this would have grated coconut (as almost everything in Kannadiga cuisine does!) but I didn’t have any.

Also you can add finely chopped peanuts/groundnuts.

Instead of lemon juice, add a tiny bit of grated ginger.

If you do not want the added oil, you can skip the tadka/oggarne (but still add the green chilies, raw).

This is my entry to Hearth and Soul and Tasty Tuesday.

Aloo Gobi

Aloo means potato and Gobi means cauliflower in Hindi. Yep, this is a North Indian dish, and as usual, can be made in a variety of ways. Sometimes with gravy, sometimes with tomato, this one is a basic dry version(sukhi).

Here are the ingredients:

  • 1tsp cumin seeds
  • pinch of hing
  • 4 slit green chilies
  • 1/2 red onion
  • 1 inch ginger grated
  • 1/4tsp turmeric
  • 1/2tsp chili powder
  • 1/2tsp cumin powder
  • @1/2 head of cauliflower chopped (I kept it bigger than the potatoes because it tends to break up while cooking, and cook faster too)
  • 6 fingerling potatoes or 3 regular ones
  • 1/2 t garam masala
  • coriander leaves (cilantro)

See my new little knife that I got for free. It’s cute and sharp.

With a wave of my magic new knife:

Heat a pan, add oil. Then add cumin seeds and hing. Then in go the onions. Once the onions are translucent, add in the ginger and powdered spices. Stir it around, then add the potatoes and cauliflower and salt. Stir to coat it well. Add about 1/4c water to the pan and cover. Stir occasionally, and add more water if you need to, but very little. The water should be just enough to “steam” the vegetables and keep the bottom from burning, but not make it watery. If the bottom browns a little thats okay… I like the browned bits! Uncover and stir in the garam masala. Cook until dry. Top with chopped coriander leaves.

Serve with dal and rice or curd/raita and roti.

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